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Are we all resilient?



Today I want to talk to you about resilience.

To put it simply, to be resilient is to be robust and solid. In physics, it's the ability of materials to withstand shocks. In psychology, it's the ability to bounce back, to continue functioning normally despite shocks and traumas (the story of Viktor Frankl and Boris Cyrulnik illustrates this phenomenon perfectly).


Contrary to popular belief, Nature is resilient: oceans are resilient, forests are resilient. Thanks to the efforts of some, Nature is slowly but surely reclaiming its rights. We know that the number of humpback whales and bluefin tuna has increased significantly since certain actions were taken. We know that Aleppo pines, when caught in a fire, release large quantities of seeds, enabling them to regrow when the soil is ready. Obviously, the more we preserve and maintain biodiversity, the easier this ecological resilience will be.


But resilience can be seen from another angle. Getting back to our initial state is all very well, but transforming our trials and tribulations into a strength, a reason to love life even more, to focus on what's bright and inspiring, to identify what makes us feel good, what puts us in a positive state, is even better.


Every ordeal is an opportunity to tap into our inner strengths and unsuspected resources. What if we were to look at our lives, damaged by trials and tribulations, like ceramics broken into many pieces? What if we took up Kintsukiroi, that ancestral Japanese art? Isn't it wonderful to take the time and courage to glue the pieces back together and sublimate the cracks with metal powder? Take the time to look at these pieces, take the time to repair yourself, to come back even stronger and richer, to become aware of the fragility and ephemeral nature of existence. Take the time to reassess your priorities. Rediscover your childlike heart and eyes, and marvel at everything. To feel gratitude for the little things, to be moved by a look, a child's laugh, a tender gesture, a landscape...


If I'm talking to you today about resilience, it's because I know a thing or two about it. I have a scar on my face that I sometimes wish I could cover with gold dust. Even without gold, this scar reminds me every time I look in the mirror that I'm a strong woman because I've chosen to bounce back, expose myself to the gaze of others and, above all, help as many people as possible by practicing as a hypnotherapist.


I see your cracks, I understand them and I help you to draw the gold from within yourself to cover them, because I want you too to rediscover your childlike smile, your élan vital, your joie de vivre.







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